1   +   9   =  

By Friday evening, countless pour souls pour out of office buildings, and leave behind pitiful looking cubicles. There isn’t enough caffeine in the world to put a smile on those same faces come Monday morning. Extreme adulting has become the new norm, and most people deal with this by zoning out on social media for hours at a time.

We’re all working so many stressful hours these days, and it’s leaving us on the verge of a collective nervous breakdown. By the time the weekend comes, we spend two days binge watching Netflix shows and eating junk food on the couch in our sweatpants.

In her book about creativity, The Artist’s Way, Julia Cameron says, “Serious art is born from serious play.” As children, we had no problem using our imagination, playing in the dirt and creating art. Life was fun, hopeful, and everything seemed like a curious miracle.

When I was a child, I spent entire days playing outside. I would create a “restaurant” and cook various dishes using dirt, twigs, grass, flowers and anything else I could find. I considered myself the Gordon Ramsey of the neighborhood. I climbed trees, went rollerblading, and swam at the city pool.

Now that I’m pregnant with my own child, I find myself looking forward to having an excuse to play children’s games again. But, why does their need to be an excuse? Why, as adults, are we not allowed to play anymore?

Dr. Stuart Brown of the National Institute for Play told NPR, “What you begin to see when there’s major play deprivation in an otherwise competent adult is that they’re not much fun to be around.”

Do yourself a favor today, and get in touch with your inner-child so you can become a happier adult. What games did you used to play? Have you not been spending enough time outside? Can you buy yourself a coloring book, or a toy that looks really fun? Treat yourself to something you’ve been wanting to do or buy without feeling guilty that it’s not something for adults.

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