Trust me, I know. Leaving jobs can be tough. Some of us are cursed with a sense of ownership that we feel so deeply about a company that’s not even ours! We feel miserable because it’s the feeling we get when abandoning a sinking ship.

But seriously, stop right there.

It’s not your baby. You are, after all, an employee. If you can for reals justify your reasons (or not!) for leaving, by all means, leave. Even if you were a founding employee, remove yourself of that guilt you are not supposed to even have.

Disclaimer #1: I already work 2 1/2 of the 3 jobs I do from home. So just maybe this is a biased perspective of someone who has been in an “office” for a short time. However, if you are leaving a job and are stuck in a rut on how to get out of it, here’s help.

Disclaimer #2: Please do not quit your desk job and invest in that dream trip straight up, please don’t. It’s silly AF.

I recently quit a twice-a-week in-office gig. It was daunting to say the least, working from an office, poker facing my way through the whole day. Sometimes making silly conversations and taking designated tea breaks. Praise be, it wasn’t a traditional office and more along the lines of a startup.

I was also listening to the most recent episode on the Bad Yogi podcast and realized how much I resonated with what both Adrien and Erin had to say. Like I said, I am likely to be biased about it. However, my reasons for working from home are pretty much similar to yours! But that’s a discussion for another day. Here’s my go-to leaving a job checklist:

Are you happy?

I won’t lie if I told you that I was counting the days to leave the job. It had become a strain on me and my life. Due to being so used to working from work, which in this case translates to taking my work home, this overly efficient practice really backfired on me.

When I had decided that it was time to leave, like many things in life, I made a list of reasons as to why I was leaving. I had to tell something to my employer, after all, and not mumble my way through it. He had hired me for my communications skills, and mumbling my way through it didn’t seem too impressive when leaving. 

My reasons for leaving were not too many, but that in itself made me realize that I also didn’t have too many reasons supporting a decision to stay, either. When making my list, the biggest reason to leave my job was, simply, that I was not happy.

Why did you join in the first place?

Something I always tell to anyone who would listen to me is that skills can always be learned if you put your heart into it. It’s the perception of the people and their attitude towards learning that matters. So was I happy with the people around me? Leaving aside two or three favorites, no, I wasn’t. I didn’t have much heart at the moment either. For a part-snob who didn’t like people, it was difficult for me to adjust to all of this. My anxiety shot up and, next thing I know, I was breathing into paper bags a la a Hollywood movie.

If the people were meh, did I like my job and the work I did? Most importantly, why did I join the company?

It’s natural to have a change in your job role during the course of your job. But then, what happens when you suddenly find yourself doing things you absolutely hate? Personally, I am not one for change. For constant changes at least. I am one of those people that need needs time to change and don’t believe in spontaneous overnight change. Slow and sustainable is the way forward for me. If your employer disagrees, you’ve now given yourself another reason to leave.

How conducive is your work environment?

As a work-from-home snob, I like my peace and quiet. Yes, I do listen to music while working but that is only because I want to and not because I want to drown out the noise. I also need breathing space. Anxiety needs breathing space or anxiety invites itself over along with other nonsensical blasts from the pasts. My job wasn’t not giving me this environment I longed for.

 

What are the reasons in your leaving a job checklist and how much of a ‘work snob’ are you? Let us know in the comments! 

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