ICYMI, Jennifer Lopez and her MLB player boyfriend, Alex Rodriguez, just finished a 10-day no sugar, no carb diet. During the challenge, celebrities and magazines alike were commenting on J.Lo’s posts, calling her inspiring, commenting on her abs (yes, even ex-boyfriends chimed in) and giving the diet a try themselves. J.Lo heavily documented her journey on Instagram, and for 10 days, we watched J.Lo and ARod (mostly) suffer.

10 days later

Let’s be honest, J.Lo looked GREAT at the end of the 10-days, but she also always looks great, and is a religious fitness advocate, so I’m not surprised by that. If anything, I’ll applaud her for sticking to that for 10 days, because I don’t need to see my abs THAT badly.

But was J.Lo’s diet healthy? A nutritionist weighs in

There was a whole lot of talk about the diet, and jaws around the world dropped. J.Lo is even hinting at a round two, apparently. But was it healthy? That’s not something that much of anyone was actually talking about, so we wanted to get the perspective from a nutritionist to weigh in on the 10-day diet. Read from Bernie Jensen, NTP with her insights:

“Based on the fact that she said she was eating no carbs or sugar, it seems like a very drastic crash diet version of the keto diet. But, I assume that she wasn’t replacing her carbs with healthy fats or more protein like she should have been. What this means is that she was probably under-eating and no surprise that she was starving the entire time.

I do not think this is healthy. I also do not think that the reasoning behind doing it is a healthy mindset. Of course we all want to lose weight and look great, but at what cost? Starving yourself for 10 days will teach you nothing about living a healthy lifestyle, eating healthy food, or loving your body. It is basically a form of eating disorder, especially if you are continuing to do it.

There are a lot of things that can go wrong by eating that way and under-eating, even if just for 10 days. Most people eat primarily carb heavy diets, and even though it may not seem like it, these foods actually have quite a bit of water in them and provide minerals necessary for the body to hold onto water.

The negative effects of no carbs

Jensen continues, “One of the biggest issues people see when going extremely low carb is dizziness, dehydration, muscle aches/cramps, and general fatigue from being dehydrated and having low electrolytes. These can be replaced through food or supplementation, but the adjustment period can be harsh.

Another thing, even if you lose fat in those 10 days, if you go back to bingeing on those carbs afterwards, it’s going to come right back. A no carb, no sugar diet is certainly a quick fix, but it honestly sounds miserable. When you are doing something like eliminating entire food groups, it can definitely be dangerous to your health, and it may not show up right away.

Making change- the healthy way

So how do we make permanent, healthy change? Jensen chimes in: “To do that in a healthy way, you need to up your other macronutrients to continue to provide fuel to your body. When you’re eliminating all carbs, that means many (if not all) vegetables too, which are an essential part of a healthy diet.

Women especially should be careful to crash diet like this because it can effect your metabolism, your hormones, your blood sugar and your bodies’ ability to lose weight in the future.

It didn’t take you 10 days to get where you currently are and you won’t magically be skinny and feel amazing after 10 days of this. I can say, there is never a downside to eliminating sugar, but all carbs entirely is not a good idea. Most people have this same problem with the keto diet, but the truth with the keto diet is that when you do it properly, you don’t eliminate all carbs.

Overall, I would never recommend people, especially women and anyone who is doing weightlifting or vigorous exercise, go below 20g of carbs a day because it’s rather unnecessary to try and “keto harder” like that. I can’t say that this 10 day challenge would really offer any long term positive results, aside from maybe teaching you that you CAN live without sugar and break the addiction a little bit.”

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